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2013 Traffic Fines in Europe – All the values you want to Know

Every country has its rules when it comes to violation of the traffic code. As fines increase from year to year it is good to know what we can expect on the road when we are abroad.

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Each European country has its rules when it comes to fines. Some countries are more lenient, while others are very strict. If Eastern Europe fines are generally relatively small compared to what happens in the West, Nordic countries already beat records when it comes to those who violated the traffic rules to pay for their mistakes.

The police are not playing especially when it comes to speeding or driving under the influence of alcohol. To inform drivers, the German Automobile Club (ADAC) has gathered in a table some information on the most common traffic fines from all European Union countries.

Alcohol consumption

Studying the table published by ADAC, we find that our country remains in a select league where the alcohol level while driving is 0.0. Along with Romania in this league we can also find Slovakia, Czech Republic and Hungary. The rest of Europe allows drivers to drink a beer or a glass of wine and drive, an absolutely normal thing to do. For most European countries – and even in Turkey – permitted blood alcohol varies between 0.2 and 0.8 g / l of pure alcohol in the blood.

Among the more permissive European countries is the UK, which allows a blood alcohol level of 0.8 per thousand, but where police may require the person tested to prove they can drive. Beyond this limit, the fine is hefty, starting from 5,700 EUR, plus loss of driver’s license and other sanctions.

Exceeding the speed limit

With regard to speeding, Scandinavian countries are champions. Norway is the most stringent of them, fining speeding with 20 km / h over the limit with at least 480 EUR. In Italy, for speeding with 50 km / h over the limit the minimum fine is 530 EUR and for entering the intersection on a red light the minimum fine is 170 EUR. Also, in most European countries, the fines increase at night: between 10 pm and 7am they can go up with one third.

There is a general rule in Europe: if fines are paid immediately or within a very short time the offender can receive a substantial reduction of the amount. If in Romania we are talking about 50% of the amount within 48 hours, in Greece half of the amount can be paid if the fine is paid within 10 days. A more particular system of fines is to be found in Denmark and Finland, where fines are calculated based on the income of the offender. For example, in Finland, they take 225 EUR and the remaining amount is divided by 60, resulting in a fine day or daily income (VZ) that the offender may do without.

The amount is then multiplied by a number ranging from 1 to 120, depending on the seriousness of the offense, this being determined by a judge. The lowest value for a fine day or daily income in Finland is 6 euro. Those who make mistakes in traffic in Finland can calculate the fine HERE. A similar system is used by the neighbors in Sweden.

Max alcohol (g/l) Exceeding alcohol(euro) >20 km/h (euro) >50 km/h (euro) Passing a red light (euro) No overtaking (euro) No parking (euro)  Using your cellphone (euro)
No seatbelt (euro)
AUT 0.5 from 300 from 20 up to 2.180 from 70 from 70 from 20 from 50 from 35
BEL 0.5 from 150 from 100 from 300 from 150 from 150 from 50 from 100 from 50
BiH 0.3 from 200 from 25 from 200 from 150 from 150 from 25 from 10 from 20
BUL 0.5 from 100 from 25 from 120 from 25 from 25 from 5 from 25 from 25
CRO 0.5 from 90 from 65 from 660 from 260 from 90 from 40 from 65 65
CYP 0.5 from 100 from 35 from 85 from 85 from 85 from 85 from 85 from 85
CZE 0.0 from 100 from 60 from 200 from 100 from 200 from 60 from 60 80
DEN 0.5 in relation to income from 135 from 335 270 270 from 70 200 200
EST 0.2 from 400 120 800 up to 385 up to 385 from 40 up to 200 up to 200
FIN 0.5 from 15 VZ from 70 14 VZ from 10 VZ from 10 VZ 10-50 up to 115 35
FRA 0.5 from 135 from 135 1500 from 135 from 135 from 15 from 135 from 135
GER 0.5 from 500 from 35 from 240 90-320 30-250 10-70 40 30
GRE 0.5 from 80 from 100 from 350 from 350 from 350 from 40 100 from 350
HOL 0.5 from 350 from 160 from 510 220 220 from 90 220 130
HUN 0.0 from 980 from 100 from 200 from 330 from 330 from 165 from 100 from 30
GB 0.8 from 5.715 from 70 up to 2.860 from 70 from 70 from 35 from 35 up to 585
IRL 0.5 from 200 from 80 from 80 from 80 from 80 from 40 from 60 from 60
ISL 0.5 from 425 from 60 from 90 90 from 90 from 10 30 60
ITA 0.5 from 500 from 170 from 530 from 170 from 85 from 40 from 155 from 80
LET 0.5 from 215 from 10 from 110 from 30 from 20 from 30 15 30
LIT 0.4 from 290 from 10 from 290 from 115 from 115 from 30 from 30 from 30
LUX 0.5 from 100 from 50 from 145 145 145 from 25 75 75
MAL 0.8 from 1.200 from 70 from 70 from 60 from 25 from 25 from 25 from 25
MAC 0.5 from 250 from 20 from 45 from 300 from 35 from 45 45 20
MUN 0.3 from 70 from 70 from 150 from 70 from 70 from 60 from 60 from 40
NOR 0.2 from 670 from 480 from 1.500 700 700 from 100 175 200
POL 0.2 from 145 from 25 from 100 from 75 from 60 from 25 from 50 25
POR 0.5 from 250 from 60 from 300 from 120 from 120 from 30 from 120 from 120
ROM 0.0 from 145 from 95 from 145 from 65 from 95 from 30 from 65 from 30
SWE 0.2 from 40 VZ from 290 from 480 from 300 from 300 from 25 no interdiction 180
SWI 0.5 from 485 from 145 from 60 VZ 200 from 240 from 30 80 50
SER 0.3 from 45 from 45 from 135 from 135 from 135 from 55 45 45
SVK 0.0 from 450 from 50 from 350 150 150 from 30 from 60 from 20
SLO 0.5 from 300 from 50 from 300 250 from 500 from 40 120 120
SPA 0.5 from 500 from 100 from 600 from 200 from 200 from 200 from 200 from 200
TUR 0.5 from 250 from 60 from 80 from 60 from 80 from 30 from 30 30

*amounts in this table are expressed in euros. VZ = daily income or day-fine.

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